THE SPLENDOR OF SCOTLAND - New work by Sean McLusky

The Maurice Einhardt Neu Gallery is proud to present

New work by Sean McLusky



Scotland is progressive nation built on dynamism, creativity and the fabulous warmth of its people. Here you will find a diverse and dramatic landscape, natural resources, population, economy and industry. Tourism is one of Scotland’s most lucrative assets, focusing on such attractions as golf, walking and a rich history. In industry, too, the country is pioneering and enterprising. Key business sectors include life sciences, electronic technologies, energy and financial services. Scotland also boasts a thriving export market with an impressive global reach, especially in food and drink – including Scotland’s famous whisky – and chemicals. The Scottish people are also its major strength. In the workplace, they are well-educated, skilled and motivated – and are proud of their heritage of inventiveness and innovation. They also like to play – whether it’s a party, festival or sporting event.

While Scotland is a small nation it has big ambitions.

Scotland has been handing down its traditions for close to a thousand years now, since the earliest days of the clans in the 12th century. However, Scottish traditions are not something sterile under glass and steel in a cold museum. They are vibrant, living things, constantly growing and evolving, and every generation adds the thumbprint of its own particular Scottish culture to the whole. Everybody knows the cliché of the piper on the shortbread tin. But have you experienced the breath-taking reality of a hundred pipers skirling in uplifting unison? This isn’t an image from Scotland’s cultural past: it happens every August at the Edinburgh Military Tattoo and on Glasgow Green. Or take food, for example. We all know the stereotypical notions of traditional Scottish fare - haggis, porridge and whisky. Not anymore. Scotland’s new elite of super-chefs like Gordon Ramsay, Nick Nairn and Andrew Fairlie are taking the country’s incredible natural produce – our beef, venison and seafood – and elevating them to Michelin starred levels. Or that the kilt is making a comeback on the catwalk as designers like Jean Paul Gaultier, Vivienne Westwood and Glasgow’s own Jonathan Saunders take traditional Scottish dress to places the clan chiefs never dreamed of. The traditional Burns Supper, Hogmanay and St Andrews Day celebrations are still very much a part of Scottish culture but the Scots are now joined on these special days by Scot-o-philes across the globe. “Auld Lang Syne”, a traditional Scottish song first written down by Burns, is the second most popular song in the world after “Happy Birthday”. Scotland’s culture has been shaped by a long tradition of strong-willed and influential characters. View our gallery to find out more about these important Scottish figures. Scottish people have a worldwide reputation for warmth and friendliness. Whether it’s the 2.5 million visitors who travel to Scotland every year or the thousands who come to live permanently, so many talk of a genuine friendliness and a welcoming hospitality. Did you know that almost three quarters of European visitors say that one of the main reasons for visiting Scotland is its people. The Scots love people – and they like to make others feel at home. You’ll find an enthusiastic friendliness in so many places. Ask a stranger for directions, buy something in a local shop, eat or drink in a pub or restaurant or put on the kettle in your workplace kitchen and you’ll be met with a smiling face and a friendly “Let me help”, “Tell me more about yourself” or “How are you?” Scottish people are proud of their nationality but they also have a long tradition of welcoming new people and cultures. Historically, Scotland has appreciated the benefits of embracing different cultures. Today, Scotland is a richly diverse country with dozens of different cultures living in harmony. Tolerance, equality of opportunity and social justice are important principles of Scottish people and communities. Scotland knows how to party – and extends an invitation to all. From large Hogmanay (New Year’s Eve) street parties and music and film festivals to more intimate Burns’ Suppers and St Andrew’s Day celebrations, there is always a fun event to attend. Getting together, sharing good times, ‘having a blether’ and welcoming others with open arms give Scotland its reputation for being a happy and friendly country. Really, it’s no wonder that 50 million people around the world claim Scottish ancestry – and so many want to be a part of our Scottish family. In this section, you’ll find all the facts about Scotland you need to know, including information about the Scottish population, their language as well as famous Scottish people.








  • October
  • Mat Collishaw, Charlotte Dualé, Wolfgang Ganter, Isabelle Graeff, Phoebe Collings-James, Sarah Lederman, Polly Morgan, Boo Saville, Volker Sieben, and Tim Noble & Sue Webster


  • November
  • SEEN…
  • S.C.U.M & Matthew Stone, An Experiment On A Bird In The Air Pump & Martin Sexton, V.E.G.A.S. Whores & Adham Faramawy, Project:KOMAKINO & Ciaran O’Shea